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Posts Tagged ‘stoic week’

Stoic Week – Running on fumes

November 30, 2013 Leave a comment

I’ve been blogging daily now for the whole of Stoic Week, some of my discussions (Marcus Aurelius joke here) I’m proud of and others… well, let’s just say I’m not expecting any blogging awards this year. I’ve come up short today. I have nothing to say about philanthropy that hasn’t been said already. Making up something important sounding to say just to fill space is not something I’m going to do. I’m not going to say anything if I don’t have anything interesting to say.

Suffice to say that I think that if everyone subscribed to stoic philanthropy, then it would be a wonderful philosophy but the fewer people who subscribe, the more difficult it will be for them. I suppose though, on the other hand, who cares how difficult it is when it’s the right thing to do. Damn, that’s almost important sounding.

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Stoic Week – Sore Losers and Stoic Philosophy

November 29, 2013 Leave a comment

I am quite a sore loser. I’m not the worst sore loser I know (who shall remain nameless) but I do moan and sulk more than a grown human should. I get frustrated because I see myself as a great strategist and tactician so when the plans fail I feel as though my intelligence is being challenged, or ‘life is being unfair’.

Neither are things that actually happen when I lose a game but I still get frustrated by it. This is because we learn from our parents and my father is quick to anger, slow to apologise. I realise my mistakes and I also get frustrated by knowing when I’m acting as he does rather than acting as I should. So let’s look at my reactions from a Stoic Sage’s perspective: My feeling insulted by losing a game is the result of one of two things; either my strategy was beaten by a superior strategy, in which case my strategy wasn’t successful but I now know more about it’s weaknesses and the failure wasn’t fatal so I can always try again; or I was unlucky, in which case the random chance that resulted in my failure could easily have gone the other way and there’s no reason to be frustrated.

One reason I may feel frustration at my plans being foiled by those meddling kids might be because when I construct the plan in my mind, I assume success after success, nothing in my plan can possibly go wrong in my mind. This is of course ridiculous, so when planning I need to include contingencies for possible failures. Looking back on the computer game battle I lost on Sunday. The plan involved always hitting with mortars and that once a unit broke, that it wouldn’t regroup so when my mortars missed completely with a couple of barrages and the enemy cavalry unit regrouped, I felt frustrated and didn’t have a contingency ready. If I had included a second cavalry unit of my own, and an additional unit of infantry, I would have the additional men required to handle these failures.

This is what the Friday exercise seeks to get us to think about, sort of. Instead of having contingencies set up for when things go wrong, the exercise was about accepting the fact that things have gone wrong and not getting annoyed about things which I had no control over. So when the enemy cavalry regrouped and turned to charge into the fray, instead of being angry that this seemingly unlikely result happened, I would merely accept that it did and that it was beyond my control.

This stoicism can expand to other areas of our lives, apparently the original stoics used to contemplate their own deaths so that they could face it with stoicism. It was recommended we didn’t choose something so traumatic to begin with, but rather to build up to them beginning with small things that bother us. My sore loser attitude is, to my mind, the perfect example for this, it’s not supposed to be traumatic or a big deal in any way and so if I can work on accepting my losses in video games, I can build towards accepting my losses in day to day life, like that pile of rejection letters in my recycling bin.

Stoic Week – I think I think too much

November 28, 2013 Leave a comment

I have restarted this blog post. I was going to write it about how I was an unconscionable jerk and how I judge people as the impressions of them that I have, rather than as the person they are. I had to stop that, why? Because I found myself doing the everything-thing:

Yeah, I managed to, in my effort to realise that I shouldn’t be treating people as if they are the impressions I have of them, develop negative and unhealthy emotions regarding my decisions and desires. New start then, I think too much. This is a shorthand, if I were to type out my full meaning it would be the following:

I think a LOT and sometimes when I’m thinking, I start accepting my beliefs and impressions as truth and reality. I then ruminate on them further and decide that these facts shouldn’t be, I want to try to change things, I realise that only part of what I want to change is under my control and the parts that I do control, I think ‘I’m too lazy and stupid to do that’. I end up feeling impotent, wretched and pathetic.

There is a flipside, however, I noticed it happening and can now act against that sneaky hate spiral. Preventing these thoughts from causing further damage. I’m just going to pause here and take a moment to feel good about that.

Source: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/a-winner-is-you

I never played this game.

It seems like there is a lot of advice for when external factors are affecting your emotions but not a lot about when your feelings get in the way of doing what is right. This sometimes is something which makes me do the everything thing because, maybe I’m just not that good person if I can’t be bothered to put in the effort to put in the extra effort required to be good. But I suppose the excuse is ‘I’m only human’ and that I can always try again tomorrow. As long as I keep trying, I suppose that is the difference between good and bad.

But then good and bad isn’t an inherent trait of a person, it’s more the evaluation of their effects over time and, as Sirius says “the world isn’t split into good people and death eaters, we all have both light and dark in us”. I think the important takeaway from today’s task for me is to stop thinking as if your thoughts are as valid as real data.

Stoic Week – On Arrogance

November 27, 2013 Leave a comment

This blog includes quite a ramble before I get to the point but…

Source: http://peachquilting.com/2012/09/27/bear-with-me/

Pun haters can take this with stoic acceptance.

I remember being called a boffin as a kid. I was labelled smart at a very young age, ha, starting school I was reading books other kids hadn’t heard of, or whose older brothers and sisters were reading. This isn’t a boast, it’s a complaint. I was labelled as intelligent and thought that this was something that I had, a trait like the colour of my hair.

Let’s skip the part where I develop the arrogance of a one-eyed man in the land of the blind and discuss the important part. My personality speaks of someone who is extremely rational. Something I hear a lot: “Hey James, you’re really rational.” Now, when something is repeated enough, whether or not it’s actually true, you start to believe it. I’m not saying I’m not clever, I think I am pretty clever, but the problem is a misunderstanding of why I’m intelligent.

This is the problem I have (re-)discovered through today’s lunch dinnertime exercise: In my arrogance I have not bothered to check my rationalism, or my ability to see the world as it truly is. The fact is that I am very arrogant and see myself as some lone genius who has a finger on the pulse of the big issues of the world. Haha no, fortunately, the rationalist inside of me, the one who got me labelled as a genius in the first place, knows that’s nonsense.

So, how the hell does this relate to accepting external things outside of my control? I’m getting there… honest. So, I grew up learning all of these wonderful things like what a mammal is, the planets in the solar system (and unlearning “Pluto is a planet”) and thought that knowing this stuff was the thing that made me intelligent. Then I found out that there are stupid people who know these supposedly ‘intelligent’ things.

Source: http://amandabauer.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/ceres.html

P.S. James likes Ceres more too.

Then I found out that there are clever people who don’t know science (shout out to a lot of my university friends) but knew other things instead. I discovered I had been mixing two  things which we often confuse: intelligence and knowledge. Intelligence is the ability to use knowledge while knowledge is the accumulation of facts.

The world got a little more complicated for me. Now, finally, to the point when I was growing up, I had this hierarchy of people, my parents knew better than me, so did my teachers. Now I’m all grown up, I’m learning that this is really not the case and while they might have twenty years of experience on me, this makes them think that they know things beyond their experience. It also makes them likely to misunderstand a discussion.

Now here is where it relates to the Stoic Week task for today: I often get annoyed when being misunderstood, I often get annoyed when someone thinks something wrong, or doesn’t understand why something is wrong. This is my lack of stoic acceptance. I’m a very intelligent person (This is a boast) and a quite knowledgeable one too so facing the world as it is, in which there are people who don’t understand or don’t know the things that I do but this is beyond my control so there is no sense getting worked up by it.

And now, we’ve reached the conclusion of my waffle.

Stoic Week – I bought a packet of Pringles

November 26, 2013 Leave a comment

I like to think that I’m an austere person. I’m unemployed and live with my parents. I don’t have much money, I don’t have to spend much money so I don’t spend much money. I like to think this would make today’s topic of Self-Discipline and Stoic Simplicity a cake-walk. Unfortunately, being mindful of the force all of my actions means that I would have to say that the task is actually extremely difficult for me to succeed at.

To begin the day, I woke up late, as usual. I stay up late to try to make sure that I’ve done something with my day so I get up late and find that I’ve wasted half the day already. Which made the early morning afternoon reflection particularly poignant. But I didn’t get to it until after I returned from my appointment at the Job Centre. Unfortunately this trip resulted in my visiting the 99p store to buy some Pringles and sweets.

When I return home, I read about how the whole of today was supposed to be about Stoic Simplicity and letting go of external desire for health and wealth. I immediately thought of my lack of funds and how I was very good at not spending much money because I don’t have it. I concluded that I was doing well on this front.

Thinking further into it. I realised that my laziness and decision to buy tasty treats constituted  a fairly important failing of the stoic part of the simplicity. You see the difference between my austerity and the Stoic Simplicity I was meant to be striving for is that my austerity is controlled by the external pressures of economics and not by a self-discipline overcoming the desires I have.

I would suppose that the up side of this failing is that I realised it. It means that I am at least mindful of the reasoning behind my actions and how they are, or are not Stoic in nature. This is not me being stoic. This is me learning to be stoic.